Archive for the ‘Revit Architecture 2011’ Category

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Images in Revit – Raster V.S. Vector

October 20, 2011

In Revit 2011 image files can give you some problems when used in viewports, such as details captured from a scan of an old project.  While the detail may look clean without edges you may experience ghosting of the image boundaries when producing pdf files.  I had this happen using both the Adobe and Cutepdf writers.  I suspect it has something to do with the way Revit communicates the outgoing file to the format writer, because the fix can be found in Revit.

In the print control interface.  Go to the “Setup” button in the lower right of the print control interface.  Here you will find two options for processing the file.  “Vector” and “Raster”.   Vector processing is faster and cleaner but will create ghosting of the image file edges in your pdf’s that will print in hard copy.  Raster takes about 2 to 3 times longer to process but eliminates the ghost edges.  The other down side with the output is that it is less crisp.  I would estimate a 10% reduction in print quality.

I suspect the image boundaries during vector processing in Revit are being interpreted by the pdf writer as lines.  What is even stranger is you don’t always get all edges as lines.  It appears to be an arbitrary assignment as to which edges are seen as lines.

David Metcalf at CADsoft also did a little trouble shooting on my pdf files and noted that the free pdf reader called Foxit did not show any lines in the Vector processed file, while Adobe did.  David also indicated the Foxit viewer is a lot crisper.

Looks like Revit and Adobe could use a little tune up to get this issue addressed.

It’s time to Slip out of the Office.

Until my next Revit speed bump.

Enjoy
Carl

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BIMproductivity.com

July 14, 2011

I’ve been playing with a small side project this year and have yet to formally introduce it until now. It’s a website I set up to offer Revit families, schedules, and methodology for boosting productivity while designing and documenting our built environment.

In striving for quality over quantity BIM Productivity has a small offering of families and schedules that provide near instant and accurate results for doing the necessary yet mundane tasks of code analysis or engineering directly within Revit.

One such family helps calculate the required plumbing fixtures per the 2006 version of the International Building Code (IBC) and the International Plumbing Code (IPC) (read a full description here).   It is super quick and easy to use for demonstration of building code compliance and studies but I don’t want you to take my word for it. I would like you to try a free sample.  The sample family will calculate required fixtures for Business, Mercantile, and Storage occupancies and may be used on your commercial projects free of charge.  If you like what you see, or need additional occupancies, or other production enhancing families please visit BIMproductivity.com.

– Jake

 

 

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Schedules: Tricks with text.

July 12, 2011

A question on the AUGI forums came up about the ability to add or combine strings of text together in a schedule. http://forums.augi.com/showthread.php?t=131429

While that function would be great you can not directly combine strings of text in a schedule.

You can however do some mathematical formulas and “toggle” on or off preset strings of text. Take a look and try for yourself. If nothing else it could make for a nifty party trick.

For the trick you will need:

An integer parameter.
A calculated value – that is set to: Text, and a formula.

Set your formula to something like:
if(integer = 1, “Show text string 1”, if(integer = 2, “Show text string 2”, “ERROR”))

Tip: you can keep nesting IF statements if you need more than two strings of text.

Refer to the attached image for how this works.

-Jake

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Introduction of bullets in text.

June 7, 2011

In Revit 2011 we received a minor text upgrade – Bullets and numbering.

During today’s class where I was presenting all of the options for text I stumbled upon this little gem and couldn’t help but share my surprise and realization that I could have used this feature on a project earlier in the morning.  Sometimes these little upgrades slip past the more experienced user but sure are worth using once found.

-Jake

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Export a webpage.

May 20, 2011

Revit is full of often overlooked hidden gems.  Here is one that I thought I’d share that creates a complete webpage with click-able hot links.

It allows for one to export a complete set of documents that are fully integrated into a nice little web page in HTML format.  The nice thing is that all of the sections and detail markers that are click-able in Revit are also click-able in the webpage and will bring you to the page or view exported. Note: Screen shots below are from Revit Architecture 2011.

Enjoy!

-Jake

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Leading from the Model

May 9, 2011

If you read about IPD, BIM, and Revit on-line then you have surely heard of Randy Deutsch.  If not you should look him and his webpages up.  He has recently a soon to be published book titled BIM and Integrated Design: Strategies for Architectural Practice.

That said, I have not read the book but I do strongly recommend that you read his essay titled BIM Beyond Boundaries which was recently published in Design Intelligence.  Near the end of this essay Randy touches on a subject he calls “Leading from the Model”. The three paragraphs under this heading are short and sweet but the resonance behind what he wrote should be closely examined, studied and reflected upon. These two specifically struck a chord with me and my experiences:

Working in BIM provides a completely different work flow — one we have yet to leverage fully. Because those on the front lines are not only the first to discover clashes and inconsistencies but also to visualize what something looks like and how it might function, BIM allows our emerging talent to lead the process — to learn on the job while recognizing their power from their privileged position of the first look in the model.

The new leadership mandate in this process is for architects to lead from their involvement in the BIM environment. Leading from the model can be likened to leading from the middle in that BIM requires and even enables followership, and servant- and situational-leadership, as opposed to top-down or command-and-control. While leadership historically has been top-down, working in BIM and on integrated teams changes that. Leading in BIM and integrated design is more similar to followership, in which middle managers lead from within the organization. Thus with BIM, the top-down and bottom-up approaches converge, where leading from the middle becomes leading from the model.

Without getting too far towards opinion, theory and personal experiences I will leave you with two words: Paradigm shift.

Read the article in its entirety here: http://www.di.net/articles/archive/bim_beyond_boundaries/

-Jake

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Yes / No graphic presentations in Schedules

May 5, 2011

Working with yes no parameters in schedules make sense. We set them up, check the little boxes, slap the schedule on the sheet and all of a sudden we are shocked because the little radio boxes change from a checked box or unchecked box to text stating “Yes”, “No”, or a blank box.

To architects and engineers this may seem weird because historically we made matrix schedules and would identify a option with a filled circle, dot, “X” or other graphic. A “Yes” doesn’t work for us.

One method to resolve this problem is as follows:

Create your yes no parameters as normal.

Create a Calculated parameter called something like “Graphic”. Make it a Text parameter and set the formula to:

“*”

* Insert your graphic symbol between the quote marks. One way to do this is to copy and paste a symbol from the Windows Character Map.

Create new Calculated parameters for each of your Yes/No parameters. Set the formulas as:

if((nameofYESNOparam), Graphic, ” “)

Duplicate the schedule so you have a working schedule and a schedule to be placed on your sheet.

For the schedule you will place on the sheet make sure to hide the Yes/No parameters (under the formatting tab) and rename the headers as you would like them to be displayed on the sheet. Work from the working schedule and let the other schedule display the same information but in a more desirable format.

Your finished result should look something like this:

Enjoy.

-Jake