Archive for the ‘Revit Architecture 2012’ Category

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Ribbon issues for Revit 2012 after installing .Net4.5 (that installs with Revit 2014).

April 18, 2013

After installing .Net 4.5 which is installed with Revit 2014 I experienced some crippling ribbon issues. I could no longer edit sketches of various family types including floors and in-place families.

Before you try to re-install (which will not fix this), this easy to apply Hot-Fix will fix the issue promptly 2014INSTALLdotnet.

Make sure to read the Read-Me on how to apply after having service pack 2 installed.

http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/ps/dl/item?siteID=123112&id=21344242&linkID=9273944

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3D Roof tiles in Revit

July 20, 2012

As Architects and Designers I must say that we have never been happy with the way Revit handles roof tiles.  While a surface applied pattern may work well for roof plans a flat surface has never looked good in 3D views and can often look funny in elevations. I have witnessed other extreme crazy work arounds which range from from placing single tiles to custom array families. All have a tendency to madden ones patience and can takes a hit on performance.

Recently I stumbled upon Jay Holland’s blog: BIM Aficionado and was very pleased when I found his posts on this very subject.  Jay posted an elegant (but not perfect) solution to 3D roof tiles. He has even posted a sample file and families to get us started. You can find his original post here: http://bimaficionado.blogspot.com/2012/07/pattern-based-curtain-panel-roof-tile.html

It does take practice but his families and methodology work well compared to most other methods.


Image credit to Jay Holland
Happy modeling!
-Jake

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Revit 2012 vs. ArchiCAD15

December 5, 2011

The battle continues and Lachmi Khemlani at AECbytes continues to provide an in depth analysis of each application.  Whichever BIM application turns your crank these reviews will give you a detailed look at the latest improvements as well as point out the weaknesses and failings of each.  You’ll delight over your application of choice new improvements, brush off its failings and cheer for the features that dominate the competing application.  You may even get a little jealous over the capabilities of your BIM rival.

Both these reviews are very interesting reads and the summaries at the end compelling.

Revit Architecture 2012 : http://www.aecbytes.com/review/2011/RevitArch2012.html

ArchiCAD-15 :  http://www.aecbytes.com/review/2011/ArchiCAD15.html

Better than the UFC!
Carl

 

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Starting View

November 24, 2011

Let’s face it. In a team environment, BIM requires communication. To support that statement, a great new feature in Revit 2012 is Starting View.

Our team has used it to much success. We developed, and loaded into our office template, a 11×17 titleblock that gives the user information upon opening the project file. We specified this sheet & titleblock to be our Starting View. Some points to about this approach:

  • Once set as a Starting View, the file will always open on this sheet (and not a 3D view that has shadows turned on)
  • This sheet is pinned, but at the beginning of a new project we temporarily unpin to enter the project information (except for the address, you still have to go to Manage> Project Information> Address)
  • Our construction documents titleblock uses a lot of the same parameters, so that information gets pushed out to all those condocs sheets from the Starting View
  • In the sheet properties, make sure you uncheck the parameter: Appears in Sheet List…that way the Starting View sheet will not be a part of your Sheet Index
  • The info off to the left includes a date stamp, file location, a template revision tracking number and the discipline of the project (our office is Arch and Struct and we all use the same template to start with)
  • We have a space in the lower half to have team member communicate upcoming deadlines, major workings or reworkings of the model elements, etc…
  • We used to save and sync-to-central from a drafting view, but a titleblock/sheet is much more effective because you can enter it right there without going to the Manage tab
  • It’s a quick glance & verification of the info before beginning your work

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

-Kirk

 

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BIMproductivity.com

July 14, 2011

I’ve been playing with a small side project this year and have yet to formally introduce it until now. It’s a website I set up to offer Revit families, schedules, and methodology for boosting productivity while designing and documenting our built environment.

In striving for quality over quantity BIM Productivity has a small offering of families and schedules that provide near instant and accurate results for doing the necessary yet mundane tasks of code analysis or engineering directly within Revit.

One such family helps calculate the required plumbing fixtures per the 2006 version of the International Building Code (IBC) and the International Plumbing Code (IPC) (read a full description here).   It is super quick and easy to use for demonstration of building code compliance and studies but I don’t want you to take my word for it. I would like you to try a free sample.  The sample family will calculate required fixtures for Business, Mercantile, and Storage occupancies and may be used on your commercial projects free of charge.  If you like what you see, or need additional occupancies, or other production enhancing families please visit BIMproductivity.com.

– Jake

 

 

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Schedules: Tricks with text.

July 12, 2011

A question on the AUGI forums came up about the ability to add or combine strings of text together in a schedule. http://forums.augi.com/showthread.php?t=131429

While that function would be great you can not directly combine strings of text in a schedule.

You can however do some mathematical formulas and “toggle” on or off preset strings of text. Take a look and try for yourself. If nothing else it could make for a nifty party trick.

For the trick you will need:

An integer parameter.
A calculated value – that is set to: Text, and a formula.

Set your formula to something like:
if(integer = 1, “Show text string 1”, if(integer = 2, “Show text string 2”, “ERROR”))

Tip: you can keep nesting IF statements if you need more than two strings of text.

Refer to the attached image for how this works.

-Jake

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Introduction of bullets in text.

June 7, 2011

In Revit 2011 we received a minor text upgrade – Bullets and numbering.

During today’s class where I was presenting all of the options for text I stumbled upon this little gem and couldn’t help but share my surprise and realization that I could have used this feature on a project earlier in the morning.  Sometimes these little upgrades slip past the more experienced user but sure are worth using once found.

-Jake

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Export a webpage.

May 20, 2011

Revit is full of often overlooked hidden gems.  Here is one that I thought I’d share that creates a complete webpage with click-able hot links.

It allows for one to export a complete set of documents that are fully integrated into a nice little web page in HTML format.  The nice thing is that all of the sections and detail markers that are click-able in Revit are also click-able in the webpage and will bring you to the page or view exported. Note: Screen shots below are from Revit Architecture 2011.

Enjoy!

-Jake

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Leading from the Model

May 9, 2011

If you read about IPD, BIM, and Revit on-line then you have surely heard of Randy Deutsch.  If not you should look him and his webpages up.  He has recently a soon to be published book titled BIM and Integrated Design: Strategies for Architectural Practice.

That said, I have not read the book but I do strongly recommend that you read his essay titled BIM Beyond Boundaries which was recently published in Design Intelligence.  Near the end of this essay Randy touches on a subject he calls “Leading from the Model”. The three paragraphs under this heading are short and sweet but the resonance behind what he wrote should be closely examined, studied and reflected upon. These two specifically struck a chord with me and my experiences:

Working in BIM provides a completely different work flow — one we have yet to leverage fully. Because those on the front lines are not only the first to discover clashes and inconsistencies but also to visualize what something looks like and how it might function, BIM allows our emerging talent to lead the process — to learn on the job while recognizing their power from their privileged position of the first look in the model.

The new leadership mandate in this process is for architects to lead from their involvement in the BIM environment. Leading from the model can be likened to leading from the middle in that BIM requires and even enables followership, and servant- and situational-leadership, as opposed to top-down or command-and-control. While leadership historically has been top-down, working in BIM and on integrated teams changes that. Leading in BIM and integrated design is more similar to followership, in which middle managers lead from within the organization. Thus with BIM, the top-down and bottom-up approaches converge, where leading from the middle becomes leading from the model.

Without getting too far towards opinion, theory and personal experiences I will leave you with two words: Paradigm shift.

Read the article in its entirety here: http://www.di.net/articles/archive/bim_beyond_boundaries/

-Jake

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Yes / No graphic presentations in Schedules

May 5, 2011

Working with yes no parameters in schedules make sense. We set them up, check the little boxes, slap the schedule on the sheet and all of a sudden we are shocked because the little radio boxes change from a checked box or unchecked box to text stating “Yes”, “No”, or a blank box.

To architects and engineers this may seem weird because historically we made matrix schedules and would identify a option with a filled circle, dot, “X” or other graphic. A “Yes” doesn’t work for us.

One method to resolve this problem is as follows:

Create your yes no parameters as normal.

Create a Calculated parameter called something like “Graphic”. Make it a Text parameter and set the formula to:

“*”

* Insert your graphic symbol between the quote marks. One way to do this is to copy and paste a symbol from the Windows Character Map.

Create new Calculated parameters for each of your Yes/No parameters. Set the formulas as:

if((nameofYESNOparam), Graphic, ” “)

Duplicate the schedule so you have a working schedule and a schedule to be placed on your sheet.

For the schedule you will place on the sheet make sure to hide the Yes/No parameters (under the formatting tab) and rename the headers as you would like them to be displayed on the sheet. Work from the working schedule and let the other schedule display the same information but in a more desirable format.

Your finished result should look something like this:

Enjoy.

-Jake